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Accueil > Actualités > Conférence ECOFECT - Christelle Desnues : “Viral metagenomics and the human virome” - 11 juillet 2014 - 15h00 - ENS Site Monod Amphi A

Conférence ECOFECT - Christelle Desnues : “Viral metagenomics and the human virome” - 11 juillet 2014 - 15h00 - ENS Site Monod Amphi A

par Nathalie Arbasetti - 11 juillet 2014

Christelle Desnues (Unité de Recherche sur les Maladies Infectieuses et Tropicales Emergentes, équipe Pathovirome, Université Aix Marseille) donnera une conférence sur le thème « Viral metagenomics and the human virome ». Elle aura lieu le 11 juillet à 15h à l’ENS de Lyon, site Monod, amphithéâtre A et sera suivie d’un goûter convivial de 16h à 17h (http://ecofect.universite-lyon.fr/a...) .

L’entrée est libre mais l’inscription est recommandée par email à laurence.naiglin@univ-lyon1.fr avant le 9 juillet.

Résumé de la conférence :

The human virome defines the collection of eukaryotic, archaeal and bacterial viruses that are found in and on the human body. Eukaryotic viruses may affect human health by causing acute, chronic or latent infections with symptoms ranging from mild to serious - and even fatal in the most severe cases- and many currently idiopathic diseases are potentially linked with a viral etiological agent. Bacterial viruses (bacteriophages) also indirectly influence human health by affecting bacterial community dynamic and function. Therefore, the definition of the human virome in pathological and non-pathological conditions is an important step toward understanding the role of these viruses on human health and disease. Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies allowed us to assess viral genomic information without the need of culturing or cloning. These methods not only permit the discovery of new or highly divergent viral pathogens, but also provide a broader assessment of the human virome in the absence of clinically recognized disease (the silent virome). By relying on recent examples, my presentation will illustrate advances made in the knowledge of viral communities associated with humans and present the next challenges we will face in the ever-growing field of human viral metagenomics.